PHP 5.4.33 Released

DateTime::__construct

date_create

(PHP 5 >= 5.2.0)

DateTime::__construct -- date_createReturns new DateTime object

Description

Object oriented style

public DateTime::__construct ([ string $time = "now" [, DateTimeZone $timezone = NULL ]] )

Procedural style

DateTime date_create ([ string $time = "now" [, DateTimeZone $timezone = NULL ]] )

Returns new DateTime object.

Parameters

time

A date/time string. Valid formats are explained in Date and Time Formats.

Enter NULL here to obtain the current time when using the $timezone parameter.

timezone

A DateTimeZone object representing the timezone of $time.

If $timezone is omitted, the current timezone will be used.

Note:

The $timezone parameter and the current timezone are ignored when the $time parameter either is a UNIX timestamp (e.g. @946684800) or specifies a timezone (e.g. 2010-01-28T15:00:00+02:00).

Return Values

Returns a new DateTime instance. Procedural style returns FALSE on failure.

Errors/Exceptions

Emits Exception in case of an error.

Changelog

Version Description
5.3.0 If time contains an invalid date/time format, then an exception is now thrown. Previously an error was emitted.

Examples

Example #1 DateTime::__construct() example

Object oriented style

<?php
try {
    
$date = new DateTime('2000-01-01');
} catch (
Exception $e) {
    echo 
$e->getMessage();
    exit(
1);
}

echo 
$date->format('Y-m-d');
?>

Procedural style

<?php
$date 
date_create('2000-01-01');
if (!
$date) {
    
$e date_get_last_errors();
    foreach (
$e['errors'] as $error) {
        echo 
"$error\n";
    }
    exit(
1);
}

echo 
date_format($date'Y-m-d');
?>

The above examples will output:

2000-01-01

Example #2 Intricacies of DateTime::__construct()

<?php
// Specified date/time in your computer's time zone.
$date = new DateTime('2000-01-01');
echo 
$date->format('Y-m-d H:i:sP') . "\n";

// Specified date/time in the specified time zone.
$date = new DateTime('2000-01-01', new DateTimeZone('Pacific/Nauru'));
echo 
$date->format('Y-m-d H:i:sP') . "\n";

// Current date/time in your computer's time zone.
$date = new DateTime();
echo 
$date->format('Y-m-d H:i:sP') . "\n";

// Current date/time in the specified time zone.
$date = new DateTime(null, new DateTimeZone('Pacific/Nauru'));
echo 
$date->format('Y-m-d H:i:sP') . "\n";

// Using a UNIX timestamp.  Notice the result is in the UTC time zone.
$date = new DateTime('@946684800');
echo 
$date->format('Y-m-d H:i:sP') . "\n";

// Non-existent values roll over.
$date = new DateTime('2000-02-30');
echo 
$date->format('Y-m-d H:i:sP') . "\n";
?>

The above example will output something similar to:

2000-01-01 00:00:00-05:00
2000-01-01 00:00:00+12:00
2010-04-24 10:24:16-04:00
2010-04-25 02:24:16+12:00
2000-01-01 00:00:00+00:00
2000-03-01 00:00:00-05:00

See Also

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User Contributed Notes 7 notes

up
8
joel dot kallman at gmail dot com
3 years ago
A definite "gotcha" (while documented) that exists in the __construct is that it ignores your timezone if the $time is a timestamp.  While this may not make sense, the object does provide you with methods to work around it.

<?php
// New Timezone Object
$timezone = new DateTimeZone('America/New_York');

// New DateTime Object
$date =  new DateTime('@1306123200', $timezone);   

// You would expect the date to be 2011-05-23 00:00:00
// But it actually outputs 2011-05-23 04:00:00
echo $date->format('Y-m-d H:i:s');

// You can still set the timezone though like so...       
$date->setTimezone($timezone);

// This will now output 2011-05-23 00:00:00
echo $date->format('Y-m-d H:i:s');
?>
up
8
cHao
2 years ago
There's a reason for ignoring the time zone when you pass a timestamp to __construct.  That is, UNIX timestamps are by definition based on UTC.  @1234567890 represents the same date/time regardless of time zone.  So there's no need for a time zone at all.
up
5
kendsnyder at gmail dot com
4 years ago
The theoretical limits of the date range seem to be "-9999-01-01" through "9999-12-31" (PHP 5.2.9 on Windows Vista 64):

<?php

$d
= new DateTime("9999-12-31");
$d->format("Y-m-d"); // "9999-12-31"

$d = new DateTime("0000-12-31");
$d->format("Y-m-d"); // "0000-12-31"

$d = new DateTime("-9999-12-31");
$d->format("Y-m-d"); // "-9999-12-31"

?>

Dates above 10000 and below -10000 do not throw errors but produce weird results:

<?php

$d
= new DateTime("10019-01-01");
$d->format("Y-m-d"); // "2009-01-01"

$d = new DateTime("10009-01-01");
$d->format("Y-m-d"); // "2009-01-01"

$d = new DateTime("-10019-01-01");
$d->format("Y-m-d"); // "2009-01-01"

?>
up
2
RussellG
11 months ago
Although this function throws an exception on invalid $time values (empty strings, for example), the exception can't be caught because it's a fatal exception. Use functions such as checkdate() and strtotime() to validate the string first. Example #1 should be changed to remove the try/catch block, since it's misleading.
up
2
Tim Strehle
4 years ago
"The $timezone parameter and the current timezone are ignored when the $time parameter […] is a UNIX timestamp."

Watch out – this means that these two are NOT equivalent, they result in different timezones (unless your current timezone is GMT):

<?php
$d
= new DateTime(); $d->setTimestamp($t);
echo
$o->format('O');
// +0200

$d = new DateTime('@' . $t);
echo
$o->format('O');
// +0000
?>
up
2
kendsnyder at gmail dot com
4 years ago
Also forgot to mention, that MySQL "zeroed" dates do not throw an error but produce a non-sensical date:

<?php

$d
= new DateTime("0000-00-00");
$d->format("Y-m-d"); // "-0001-11-30"

?>

Another good reason to write your own class that extends from DateTime.
up
0
Dimitar Stoichev
4 months ago
Be careful working with MySQL dates representing point of transition to Daylight Saving Time.
The constructor of DateTime will convert timezone abbreviation to DST but not the time.

<?php

$timeZone
= new DateTimeZone('Europe/Sofia');
           
$transitionToDst = '2014-03-30 03:00:00';

$date = new DateTime($transitionToDst, $timeZone);

// Outputs: Sun Mar 30, 2014 3:00:00 EEST
// Correct: Sun Mar 30, 2014 4:00:00 EEST
echo $date->format('D M j, Y G:i:s T') . '<br>';

// Explicitly setting timezone or adding one second fixes this
$cloneForAdding = clone $date;

$date->setTimezone($timeZone);

// Outputs: Sun Mar 30, 2014 4:00:00 EEST
echo $date->format('D M j, Y G:i:s T') . '<br>';

$cloneForAdding->add(new DateInterval('PT1S'));

// Outputs: Sun Mar 30, 2014 4:00:01 EEST
echo $cloneForAdding->format('D M j, Y G:i:s T');

?>
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