PHP 5.5.15 is released

Connexions et gestionnaire de connexion

Les connexions sont établies en créant des instances de la classe de base de PDO. Peu importe quel driver vous voulez utiliser ; vous utilisez toujours le nom de la classe PDO. Le constructeur accepte des paramètres pour spécifier la source de la base de données (connue en tant que DSN) et optionnellement, le nom d'utilisateur et le mot de passe (s'il y en a un).

Exemple #1 Connexion à MySQL

<?php
$dbh 
= new PDO('mysql:host=localhost;dbname=test'$user$pass);
?>

S'il y a des erreurs de connexion, un objet PDOException est lancé. Vous pouvez attraper cette exception si vous voulez gérer cette erreur, ou laisser le gestionnaire global d'exception défini via la fonction set_exception_handler() la traiter.

Exemple #2 Gestion des erreurs de connexion

<?php
try {
    
$dbh = new PDO('mysql:host=localhost;dbname=test'$user$pass);
    foreach(
$dbh->query('SELECT * from FOO') as $row) {
        
print_r($row);
    }
    
$dbh null;
} catch (
PDOException $e) {
    print 
"Erreur !: " $e->getMessage() . "<br/>";
    die();
}
?>

Avertissement

Si votre application n'attrape pas les exceptions lancées depuis le constructeur PDO, l'action par défaut du moteur zend est de terminer le script et d'afficher une trace. Cette trace devrait révéler des détails complets sur la connexion à la base de données, incluant le nom d'utilisateur et le mot de passe. Il en est donc de votre responsabilité d'attraper cette exception, soit explicitement (via l'instruction catch) ou implicitement via la fonction set_exception_handler().

Lorsque la connexion à la base de données a réussi, une instance de la classe PDO est retournée à votre script. La connexion est active tant que l'objet PDO l'est. Pour clore la connexion, vous devez détruire l'objet en vous assurant que toutes ses références sont effacées. Vous pouvez faire cela en assignant NULL à la variable gérant l'objet. Si vous ne le faites pas explicitement, PHP fermera automatiquement la connexion lorsque le script arrivera à la fin.

Exemple #3 Fermeture d'une connexion

<?php
$dbh 
= new PDO('mysql:host=localhost;dbname=test'$user$pass);
// utiliser la connexion ici


// et maintenant, fermez-la !
$dbh null;
?>

Beaucoup d'applications web utilisent des connexions persistantes aux serveurs de base de données. Les connexions persistantes ne sont pas fermées à la fin du script, mais sont mises en cache et réutilisées lorsqu'un autre script demande une connexion en utilisant les mêmes paramètres. Le cache des connexions persistantes vous permet d'éviter d'établir une nouvelle connexion à chaque fois qu'un script doit accéder à une base de données, rendant l'application web plus rapide.

Exemple #4 Connexions persistantes

<?php
$dbh 
= new PDO('mysql:host=localhost;dbname=test'$user$pass, array(
    
PDO::ATTR_PERSISTENT => true
));
?>

Note:

Si vous souhaitez utiliser des connexions persistantes, vous devez utiliser la valeur PDO::ATTR_PERSISTENT dans le le tableau des options du driver passé au constructeur PDO. Si vous définissez cet attribut avec la méthode PDO::setAttribute() après l'instanciation de l'objet, le driver n'utilisera pas les connexions persistantes.

Note:

Si vous utilisez le driver PDO ODBC et que votre bibliothèque ODBC supporte le pool de connexion ODBC (unixODBC et Windows le supportent tous les deux ; peut être plus), alors il est recommandé de ne pas utiliser les connexions persistantes PDO, mais plutôt laisser le pool de connexion ODBC mettre en cache les connexions. Le pool de connexion ODBC est partagé avec les autres modules dans le processus ; si PDO met en cache la connexion, alors cette connexion ne sera jamais retournée par le pool de connexion ODBC, faisant que plusieurs connexions sont créées pour les autres modules.

add a note add a note

User Contributed Notes 10 notes

up
138
a.rueedlinger AT gmail.com
9 months ago
In my opinion the person who is responsible for the PDOException error message should be slapped in the face!

It is unusual to reveal passwords when an error occurs.
up
14
cappytoi at yahoo dot com
3 months ago
Using PHP 5.4.26, pdo_pgsql with libpg 9.2.8 (self compiled). As usual PHP never explains some critical stuff in documentation. You shouldn't expect that your connection is closed when you set $dbh = null unless all you do is just instantiating PDO class. Try following:

<?php
$pdo
= new PDO('pgsql:host=192.168.137.1;port=5432;dbname=anydb', 'anyuser', 'pw');
sleep(5);
$stmt = $pdo->prepare('SELECT * FROM sometable');
$stmt->execute();
$pdo = null;
sleep(60);
?>

Now check your database. And what a surprise! Your connection hangs for another 60 seconds. Now that might be expectable because you haven't cleared the resultset.

<?php
$pdo
= new PDO('pgsql:host=192.168.137.160;port=5432;dbname=platin', 'cappytoi', '1111');
sleep(5);
$stmt = $pdo->prepare('SELECT * FROM admin');
$stmt->execute();
$stmt->closeCursor();
$pdo = null;
sleep(60);
?>

What teh heck you say at this point? Still same? Here is what you need to do to close that connection:

<?php
$pdo
= new PDO('pgsql:host=192.168.137.160;port=5432;dbname=platin', 'cappytoi', '1111');
sleep(5);
$stmt = $pdo->prepare('SELECT * FROM admin');
$stmt->execute();
$stmt->closeCursor(); // this is not even required
$stmt = null; // doing this is mandatory for connection to get closed
$pdo = null;
sleep(60);
?>

PDO is just one of a kind because it saves you to depend on 3rd party abstraction layers. But it becomes annoying to see there is no implementation of a "disconnect" method even though there is a request for it for 2 years. Developers underestimate the requirement of such a method. First of all, doing $stmt = null  everywhere is annoying and what is most annoying is you cannot forcibly disconnect even when you set $pdo = null. It might get cleared on script's termination but this is not always possible because script termination may delayed due to slow client connection etc.

Anyway here is how to disconnect forcibly using postgresql:

<?php
$pdo
= new PDO('pgsql:host=192.168.137.160;port=5432;dbname=platin', 'cappytoi', '1111');
sleep(5);
$stmt = $pdo->prepare('SELECT * FROM admin');
$stmt->execute();
$pdo->query('SELECT pg_terminate_backend(pg_backend_pid());');
$pdo = null;
sleep(60);
?>

Following may be used for MYSQL: (not guaranteed)
KILL CONNECTION_ID()
up
15
jak dot spalding at gmail dot com
3 years ago
Just thought I'd add in and give an explanation as to why you need to use 127.0.0.1 if you have a different port number.

The mysql libraries will automatically use Unix sockets if the host of "localhost" is used. To force TCP/IP you need to set an IP address.
up
10
neville at whitespacers dot com
4 years ago
To avoid exposing your connection details should you fail to remember to catch any exception thrown by the PDO constructor you can use the following class to implicitly change the exception handler temporarily.

<?php

Class SafePDO extends PDO {

        public static function
exception_handler($exception) {
           
// Output the exception details
           
die('Uncaught exception: ', $exception->getMessage());
        }

        public function
__construct($dsn, $username='', $password='', $driver_options=array()) {

           
// Temporarily change the PHP exception handler while we . . .
           
set_exception_handler(array(__CLASS__, 'exception_handler'));

           
// . . . create a PDO object
           
parent::__construct($dsn, $username, $password, $driver_options);

           
// Change the exception handler back to whatever it was before
           
restore_exception_handler();
        }

}

// Connect to the database with defined constants
$dbh = new SafePDO(PDO_DSN, PDO_USER, PDO_PASSWORD);

?>
up
3
alvaro at demogracia dot com
3 years ago
On connection errors, the PDO constructor seems to do two things no matter your PDO::ATTR_ERRMODE setting:

1. Trigger a warning
2. Throw a PDOException

If you set the PDO::ATTR_ERRMODE parameter, it will only take effect on further operations.
up
2
thz at plista dot com
1 year ago
If you are using PHP 5.4 and later, you can no longer use persistent connections when you have your own database class that derives from the native PDO object. If you do, you will get segmentation faults during the PHP process shutdown.

Please see this bug report for more information: https://bugs.php.net/bug.php?id=63176
up
0
Vicente
1 month ago
WARNING: please note that the documentation is FALSE and INCOMPLETE, when it states setting the variable to NULL is enough to close the connection. Unfortunately, the real signification is obscur for those who don't understand what it means setting a variable to NULL in PHP (ref count).

In fact, references count is used to determine automatically when a connection must be closed: when the connection instance is not holded by any variable anymore, it is closed. Not very flexible to manage resources allocation exactly the way you want.

PDO class actually doesn't expose any method to manually close connection it opens in the constructor.
up
0
dan dot franklin at pearson dot com
6 years ago
Note that you can specify a port number with "port=####", but this port number will be ignored if the host is localhost.  If you want to connect to a local port other than the default, use host=127.0.0.1 instead of localhost.
up
-4
angela
4 years ago
I spent hours today trying to get my portable wamp to update a database, using localhost:800 and port 3307 for mysql. For it to work I needed to adjust the connect() instruction as described:
$dsn = "mysql:host=127.0.0.1;port=3307;dbname=mydatabase";
up
-27
jgestiotremovethis at gmail dot com
3 months ago
Most web development does not warrant the use of Object Oriented Programming so it is surprising to see interfaces such as PDO are only provided as a class. The language should not force the developers to adopt Object Oriented Programming if they do not wish to use it.
To Top